Best Investing Books

Best Investing Books for 2022

Reading what the pros read, or what they write, will be the best way to improve your financial and investing education so you can upgrade your bank account and your life; so you can be rich instead of trying to look rich!

To get you started, we suggest this list of books covering several financial topics including investing, basic finances, budgeting, debt recovery, and more.

Table of Contents

The Best Investing and Finance Books in 2022

Here are some of the best investing books for 2022:

  1. Richer, Wiser, Happier: How the World’s Greatest Investors Win in Markets and Life by William Green
  2. The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham
  3. If You Can: How Millennials Can Get Rich Slowly by William J. Bernstein
  4. The Wealth Choice: Success Secrets of Black Millionaires by Dennis Kimbro
  5. The Coffeehouse Investor: How to Build Wealth, Ignore Wall Street, and Get On with Your Life by Bill Schultheis
  6. Balanced Asset Allocation: How to Profit in Any Economic Climate by Alex Shahidi
  7. Debt-Free For Life: 7 Proven Steps For Getting Out and Staying Out of Debt by Bunmi Olayanju
  8. Why Didn’t They Teach Me This in School?: 99 Personal Money Management Principles to Live By by Cary Siegel
  9. The Little Book of Common Sense Investing by John C. Bogle
  10. Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert T. Kiyosaki

Best Investing Book for 2022

Richer, Wiser, Happier: How the World's Greatest Investors Win in Markets and Life by William Green

Green presents a collection of 25 years-worth of interviews with some of the greatest investors and financial minds in his new book: Richer, Wiser, Happier. As a financial reporter with a kick-ass resume–Forbes, Time, Fortune, and The New Yorker–Green’s book offers a rare view of these investors that is as varied as it is treasure-laden. The purpose of Richer, Wiser, Happier is to demystify these billionaires, articulate their genius, and provide insights on how readers can improve their investing philosophies and their professional and personal lives.

Buy it on Indigo, Amazon

Best Investing Book for Beginners

If You Can: How Millennials Can Get Rich Slowly by William J. Bernstein

Bernstein’s professed strategy for readers is to get out of debt, save money, and invest in the sure thing. Needless to say, this method is neither fast nor exciting like trendy get-rich-quick-while-still-in-your-pajamas schemes. He recommends saving as much as you can, often referring to 15% of your income, so that you can retire comfortably. From this foundation, he offers education on financial history, the dangers of emotional investing, and how the financial industry is more interested in making itself rich than making you rich.

This book is so great for beginners because it has assignments at the end of each chapter. There’s a genuine sense of accomplishment married to the practical education Bernstein shares. And it's only 50 pages long.

Buy it on Amazon

Best Investing Classic

The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham

Called the stock market Bible, this book was originally published in 1946 and it still tops investment book lists today. It’s also among Warren Buffet’s favourites.

This book deals with Benjamin Graham’s invention, value investing, which is meant to cut through the stock market BS and maximize gains by studying companies like a med student studies anatomy, like their life depends on it. This approach takes away much of the guesswork which can turn many investors into gamblers.

In the updated publication, financial journalist, Jason Zweig, offers modern applications and context to Graham’s advice at the end of each of the 20 chapters of this how-to book.

Buy it on Indigo, Amazon

Best Book for Financial Basics

The Wealth Choice: Success Secrets of Black Millionaires by Dennis Kimbro

While the book is targeted to the Black readers–specifically African Americans–it is undeniably useful for anyone picking it up. The Wealth Choice tries to implant the idea that becoming wealthy and successful is not out of anyone’s reach if a person follows a few rules which include, loving work, learning all you can, being thrifty, and believing in yourself.

This book is largely a collection of anecdotes with Kimbro’s own experiences and advice dropped in. These stories were compiled through a large study over seven years of 1000 of the wealthiest African Americans. These entrepreneurs, business leaders and celebrities include Spike Lee, Tyrese Gibson, T.D. Jakes, and a lot more.

Buy it on Indigo, Amazon

Best Book for Investment Basics

The Coffeehouse Investor: How to Build Wealth, Ignore Wall Street, and Get On with Your Life by Bill Schultheis

The advice in this book is the opposite of earth-shattering, and that’s the reason why it’s so valuable to new investors. Schultheis advocates a hands-off approach, maybe a trade or reallocation of your portfolio once or twice a year so you can focus on living your life instead of how the markets are performing.

A previous broker at Smith Barney, Schultheis’ book is full of first-hand experiences and anecdotes to expound on his basic principles: don’t put your eggs in one basket, there’s no such thing as a free lunch, and save for a rainy day. He also argues throughout the book that attempting to “beat” the market by day-trading won’t pay off as well as a more conservative, diversified approach in the long run.

Buy it on Indigo, Amazon

Best Expert Advice on Investing

Balanced Asset Allocation: How to Profit in Any Economic Climate by Alex Shahidi

Diversify your portfolio to avoid unnecessary risks because the stock market will fluctuate. Conventional wisdom says 60% stocks and 40% bonds to keep your investment ship afloat. But Shahidi rejects this idea and takes most of the book to explain why.

With step-by-step instructions, Shahidi breaks down his investment philosophy to demonstrate how his diversification strategy is truly prepared for all economic environments in a way that the 60/40 portfolios will never be.

Buy it on Indigo, Amazon

Best Book for Debt Recovery

Debt-Free For Life: 7 Proven Steps For Getting Out and Staying Out of Debt by Bunmi Olayanju

Struggling with debt can be a crushing source of anxiety, and it may seem like all the financial investment advice out there is meant for someone else. But if you’re looking for a solution that is as precise as it is easy to follow, this 38-page book might offer the relief you’re looking for.

Olayanju lays the book out like a manual with seven no-nonsense, practical steps to help people escape the black hole of debt. Getting out of debt isn’t complicated, but that doesn’t mean it’s easy. The advice in Debt-Free for Life doesn’t mess around because debt doesn’t go away without effort.

Buy it on Amazon

Best Book for Budgeting and Planning

Why Didn't They Teach Me This in School?: 99 Personal Money Management Principles to Live By by Cary Siegel

If there was ever a book written for millennials starting their careers or even their financial education, this is it.

This book is full of great advice broken into consumable chunklets and written in a somewhat unorthodox style that forces you to pay attention and reflect on each chapter. Each lesson is practical and to the point without mollycoddling the reader. There are real consequences to poor money management.

Originally a gift for his five adult children, Siegel offers his collected experience and financial know-how so we can all step out of the weeds of adulting and make some progress.

Buy it on Amazon

Best Practical Guide to Finance

The Little Book of Common Sense Investing by John C. Bogle

Another book by another legend of the financial world, Bogle’s strategy of investing in index funds to avoid the dangers of fads or the endless searching to find that one stock that will turn your declining portfolio around has helped millions of people invest smarter and save more money through the last decade and a half.

This little book is stuffed with stats, charts, personal stories, quotes, and insights to clearly explain exactly what Bogle is trying to share: investing can be for everyone, not just the billionaires.

Buy it on Indigo, Amazon

Best Memoir

Rich Dad, Poor Dad by Robert T. Kiyosaki

I won’t lie, this book is a controversial choice for Best Memoir. For all the listicles that laud it as the greatest personal finance journey ever written, there’s another blogger who can’t stand the tone or certain bits of advice that Kiyosaki includes.

Rich Dad Poor Dad may have its detractors, but it has remained one of the most popular finance memoirs to date, and it recently released a 20th anniversary edition.

Kiyosaki details his days growing up under his own father (Poor Dad) and spending time with his friend's dad (Rich Dad). Throughout the book of Kiyosaki's life, he drops in lessons he learned from both father figures, what to do and what not to do.

Buy it on Indigo, Amazon

Frequently Asked Questions

Investing in Canadian Real Estate by Don R Campbell. Yes, it has a boring title, but it's not a fluffy book full of vague truisms anyway. Real estate investing is not an easy world to navigate, so you'll want a book that is simple and straightforward. Also, it's specifically marketed to and written for Canadian investors trying to get into the REI game. So, you don't have to pound the square leg of American practices around the round hole of Canadian laws and regulations. I hope this helps!

Great question, and not a category of books that's easy to find. I'd suggest Millionaire Teacher by Andrew Halam. He's a Canadian teacher who actually constructed an investment strategy and portfolio which ended up being worth a million dollars plus. There are personal stories, life lessons, and real data. So, in my opinion, there's something in the book to interest every type of investor. And fortunately, Halam's strategy is pretty simple to implement so you can be a lethargic investor and still accomplish your goals. Give it a go, I hope you find it helpful (and welcome to the Land of the Brave :))

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